Florida

A stewardship ethic for Florida’s forests

Conserve

Conserving working forest ecosystems through comprehensive multiple-use forest management 

Protect

Protecting forest lands from wildfire, invasive pests, climate change and other threats to ensure healthy forest ecosystems, water quality, economic viability, and other ecosystem services

Enhance

Enhancing healthy working forests by maximizing forest provided benefits for the citizens and visitors of Florida

Florida’s Working Forests

Florida’s Statewide Forest Resource Assessment provides an analysis of current forest conditions and trends in the state and defines priority rural and urban forest landscapes. The State’s Forest Resource Strategy document provides long-term plans to invest state, federal, and local resources  where they can most effectively address concerns and stimulate broad support for  working forest activities while engaging multiple partners.  The assessment and plan sets the stage for addressing critical issues to positively influence and maximize public benefits from healthy working forests across Florida.

Approximately six of every ten acres in Florida-nearly 22 million acres-are considered fire –dependent. Florida has a long history of wildfire suppression and utilization of prescribed fire as both a protective tool and to improve overall forest health. The Division of Forestry leads the way in prevention, detection, and suppression of wildfire, as well as the use of prescribed fire in Florida’s forests.

Florida’s forest resources, both urban and rural, continue to be challenged by numerous insects, diseases and non-native invasive plants. Non-native invasive pests have recently become tremendously important in the State of Florida. Cooperative efforts in the state include the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council, Cooperative Invasive Species Management Areas, and the Florida Invasive Species Partnership that continue to address these threats to the State’s forests and economy.

Longleaf Pine ecosystems are among the most threatened ecosystems in the United States. Longleaf pine once comprised about 60% of the landscape of the southeastern Coastal Plain and Florida currently has the largest number of existing acres (1,198,248 acres) in longleaf forest types. The enhancement of this important and diverse ecosystem is a priority for both public and private landowners in the state.

Agency Information

Florida Division of Forestry
3125 Conner Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1650

Jim Karels, Division Director and State Forester
Jim.Karels@freshfromflorida.com
 (850) 488-4274

Bonnie Stine, CFA Supervisor
Bonnie.Stine@freshfromflorida.com
(850) 414-9912